Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in smoking habits have stabilized in many Western countries. This study aimed at evaluating whether socioeconomic disparities in smoking habits are still enlarging in Italy and at comparing the impact of education and occupation. Methods: In the frame of the GEIRD study (Gene Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases) 10,494 subjects, randomly selected from the general population aged 20-44 years in seven Italian centres, answered a screening questionnaire between 2007 and 2010 (response percentage=57.2%). In four centres a repeated cross-sectional survey was performed: smoking prevalence recorded in GEIRD was compared with prevalence recorded between 1998 and 2000 in the Italian Study of Asthma in Young Adults (ISAYA). Results: Current smoking was twice as prevalent in people with a primary/secondary school certificate (40-43%) compared with people with an academic degree (20%), and among unemployed and workmen (39%) compared with managers and clerks (20-22%). In multivariable analysis smoking habits were more affected by education level than by occupation. From the first to the second survey the prevalence of ever smokers markedly decreased among housewives, managers, businessmen and free-lancers, while ever smoking became even more common among unemployed (time-occupation interaction: p=0.047). At variance, the increasing trend in smoking cessation was not modified by occupation. Conclusion: Smoking prevalence has declined in Italy during the last decade among the higher socioeconomic classes, but not among the lower. This enlarging socioeconomic inequality mainly reflects a different trend in smoking initiation. At present education level is a more important predictor of current smoking than occupation.

SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES IN SMOKING HABITS ARE STILL INCREASING IN ITALY

BELLISARIO, Valeria;BONO, Roberto;
2014

Abstract

Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in smoking habits have stabilized in many Western countries. This study aimed at evaluating whether socioeconomic disparities in smoking habits are still enlarging in Italy and at comparing the impact of education and occupation. Methods: In the frame of the GEIRD study (Gene Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases) 10,494 subjects, randomly selected from the general population aged 20-44 years in seven Italian centres, answered a screening questionnaire between 2007 and 2010 (response percentage=57.2%). In four centres a repeated cross-sectional survey was performed: smoking prevalence recorded in GEIRD was compared with prevalence recorded between 1998 and 2000 in the Italian Study of Asthma in Young Adults (ISAYA). Results: Current smoking was twice as prevalent in people with a primary/secondary school certificate (40-43%) compared with people with an academic degree (20%), and among unemployed and workmen (39%) compared with managers and clerks (20-22%). In multivariable analysis smoking habits were more affected by education level than by occupation. From the first to the second survey the prevalence of ever smokers markedly decreased among housewives, managers, businessmen and free-lancers, while ever smoking became even more common among unemployed (time-occupation interaction: p=0.047). At variance, the increasing trend in smoking cessation was not modified by occupation. Conclusion: Smoking prevalence has declined in Italy during the last decade among the higher socioeconomic classes, but not among the lower. This enlarging socioeconomic inequality mainly reflects a different trend in smoking initiation. At present education level is a more important predictor of current smoking than occupation.
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http://www.biomedcentral.com
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4159540/
Smoking initiation, Smoking cessation, Trends, Socioeconomic status, Italy
Verlato G.; Accordini S.; Nguyen G.; Marchetti P.; Cazzoletti L.; Ferrari M. Antonicelli L.; Attena F.; Bellisario V.; Bono R.; Briziarelli L.; Casali L.; Corsico A.G.; Fois A.; Panico M.G.; Piccioni P.; Pirina P.; Villani S.; Nicolini G.; de Marco R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/148199
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