Urban air pollution represents a global problem, since everyday many mutagenic and carcinogens compounds are emitted into the atmosphere, with consequent adverse health effects on humans and biota. Specifically, particulate matter air pollution was associated with increased risks in human mortality and morbidity. In this paper, we analyse the genomic effects on human lymphocytes of different concentrations of annual Turin PM2.5 extract by an in vitro micronuclei assay. Samplings were collected from an urban meteorological-chemical station positioned in Turin (Italy), one of the most polluted cities in Europe. PM2.5 sampled on filters was used for organic extraction in monthly pools and successively aggregated to produce a mixture representative for a full year PM2.5 collection. Lymphocytes were exposed to four concentrations of PM2.5: 5, 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL and micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds were scored. With respect to controls, PM2.5 significantly increased the frequencies of all analysed biomarkers at all tested concentrations, whereas the CBPI index was significantly reduced only at the concentration of 20 μg/mL. Such in vitro effects can both to stimulate local authorities to adopt efficient measures for air pollution mitigation and to improve human monitoring to detect early precancer lesions.

In vitro genomic damage induced by urban fine particulate matter on human lymphocytes

Alfredo Santovito
;
Claudio Gendusa;Piero Cervella;Deborah Traversi
2020

Abstract

Urban air pollution represents a global problem, since everyday many mutagenic and carcinogens compounds are emitted into the atmosphere, with consequent adverse health effects on humans and biota. Specifically, particulate matter air pollution was associated with increased risks in human mortality and morbidity. In this paper, we analyse the genomic effects on human lymphocytes of different concentrations of annual Turin PM2.5 extract by an in vitro micronuclei assay. Samplings were collected from an urban meteorological-chemical station positioned in Turin (Italy), one of the most polluted cities in Europe. PM2.5 sampled on filters was used for organic extraction in monthly pools and successively aggregated to produce a mixture representative for a full year PM2.5 collection. Lymphocytes were exposed to four concentrations of PM2.5: 5, 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL and micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds were scored. With respect to controls, PM2.5 significantly increased the frequencies of all analysed biomarkers at all tested concentrations, whereas the CBPI index was significantly reduced only at the concentration of 20 μg/mL. Such in vitro effects can both to stimulate local authorities to adopt efficient measures for air pollution mitigation and to improve human monitoring to detect early precancer lesions.
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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-65785-5
Genotoxicity, Micronuclei, Air Pollution, PM2.5, Biomonitoring, Mutagenesis
Alfredo Santovito, Claudio Gendusa, Piero Cervella, Deborah Traversi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1740251
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