Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common autoimmune disease that is characterized by insufficient insulin production. The onset of T1D is the result of gene-environment interactions. Sociodemographic and behavioural factors may contribute to T1D, and the gut microbiota is proposed to be a driving factor of T1D. An integrated preventive strategy for T1D is not available at present. This case–control study attempted to estimate the exposure linked to T1D to identify significant risk factors for healthy children. Forty children with T1D and 56 healthy controls were included in this study. Anthropometric, socio-economic, nutritional, behavioural, and clinical data were collected. Faecal bacteria were investigated by molecular methods. The findings showed, in multivariable model, that the risk factors for T1D include higher Firmicutes levels (OR 7.30; IC 2.26–23.54) and higher carbohydrate intake (OR 1.03; IC 1.01–1.05), whereas having a greater amount of Bifidobacterium in the gut (OR 0.13; IC 0.05 – 0.34) was a protective factor for T1D. These findings may facilitate the development of preventive strategies for T1D, such as performing genetic screening, characterizing the gut microbiota, and managing nutritional and social factors.

Risk factors for type 1 diabetes, including environmental, behavioural and gut microbial factors: a case–control study

Deborah Traversi
First
;
Ivana Rabbone;Giacomo Scaioli;Camilla Vallini;Giulia Carletto;Ugo Ala;Marilena Durazzo;Alessandro Collo;Arianna Ferro;Roberta Siliquini;Franco Cerutti
Last
2020

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common autoimmune disease that is characterized by insufficient insulin production. The onset of T1D is the result of gene-environment interactions. Sociodemographic and behavioural factors may contribute to T1D, and the gut microbiota is proposed to be a driving factor of T1D. An integrated preventive strategy for T1D is not available at present. This case–control study attempted to estimate the exposure linked to T1D to identify significant risk factors for healthy children. Forty children with T1D and 56 healthy controls were included in this study. Anthropometric, socio-economic, nutritional, behavioural, and clinical data were collected. Faecal bacteria were investigated by molecular methods. The findings showed, in multivariable model, that the risk factors for T1D include higher Firmicutes levels (OR 7.30; IC 2.26–23.54) and higher carbohydrate intake (OR 1.03; IC 1.01–1.05), whereas having a greater amount of Bifidobacterium in the gut (OR 0.13; IC 0.05 – 0.34) was a protective factor for T1D. These findings may facilitate the development of preventive strategies for T1D, such as performing genetic screening, characterizing the gut microbiota, and managing nutritional and social factors.
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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-74678-6
type 1 diabetes mellitus, microbiota, diabetes risk factors, α-diversity, Bifidobacterium
Deborah Traversi, Ivana Rabbone, Giacomo Scaioli, Camilla Vallini, Giulia Carletto, Irene Racca, Ugo Ala, Marilena Durazzo, Alessandro Collo, Arianna Ferro, Deborah Carrera, Silvia Savastio, Francesco Cadario, Roberta Siliquini, Franco Cerutti
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1758181
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