Background: Obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Bariatric surgery has been reported to be effective in improving both inflammatory and liver status. Our aims were to elucidate the relationships between pre-surgery high sensitivity-CRP (hs-CRP) values and post-surgery weight loss and liver steatosis and fibrosis in patients with severe obesity undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Methods: We conducted an observational prospective study on 90 individuals with morbid obesity, who underwent gastric bypass. Anthropometric indices, laboratory assessment (lipid panel, glycemic status, liver enzymes, and hs-CRP), liver stiffness and steatosis were evaluated at baseline and 6-months after surgery. Results: There was a significant post-surgery reduction in all the anthropometric variables, with an average weight loss of 33.93 ± 11.79 kg; the mean percentage of total weight loss (TWL) was 27.96 ± 6.43%. Liver elasticity was significantly reduced (from 6.1 ± 1.25 to 5.42 ± 1.52 kPa; p = 0.002), as well as liver aminotransferases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease fibrosis score (NFS) and the grade of steatosis. Serum hs-CRP levels significantly reduced (from 9.26 ± 8.45 to 3.29 ± 4.41 mg/L; p < 0.001). The correlations between hs-CRP levels and liver fibrosis (elastography), steatosis (ultrasonography), fibrosis-4 index, NFS, and surgery success rate were not significant. Regression analyses showed that serum hs-CRP levels were not predictive of liver status and success rate after surgery in both unadjusted and adjusted models. Conclusions: In patients with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery caused a significant decrease in hs-CRP levels, liver stiffness and steatosis. Baseline hs-CRP values did not predict the weight-loss success rate and post-surgery liver status.

Associations between pre-bariatric high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and post-surgery outcomes

Bo S.;Ponzo V.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Bariatric surgery has been reported to be effective in improving both inflammatory and liver status. Our aims were to elucidate the relationships between pre-surgery high sensitivity-CRP (hs-CRP) values and post-surgery weight loss and liver steatosis and fibrosis in patients with severe obesity undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Methods: We conducted an observational prospective study on 90 individuals with morbid obesity, who underwent gastric bypass. Anthropometric indices, laboratory assessment (lipid panel, glycemic status, liver enzymes, and hs-CRP), liver stiffness and steatosis were evaluated at baseline and 6-months after surgery. Results: There was a significant post-surgery reduction in all the anthropometric variables, with an average weight loss of 33.93 ± 11.79 kg; the mean percentage of total weight loss (TWL) was 27.96 ± 6.43%. Liver elasticity was significantly reduced (from 6.1 ± 1.25 to 5.42 ± 1.52 kPa; p = 0.002), as well as liver aminotransferases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease fibrosis score (NFS) and the grade of steatosis. Serum hs-CRP levels significantly reduced (from 9.26 ± 8.45 to 3.29 ± 4.41 mg/L; p < 0.001). The correlations between hs-CRP levels and liver fibrosis (elastography), steatosis (ultrasonography), fibrosis-4 index, NFS, and surgery success rate were not significant. Regression analyses showed that serum hs-CRP levels were not predictive of liver status and success rate after surgery in both unadjusted and adjusted models. Conclusions: In patients with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery caused a significant decrease in hs-CRP levels, liver stiffness and steatosis. Baseline hs-CRP values did not predict the weight-loss success rate and post-surgery liver status.
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Bariatric surgery; Fatty liver disease; Inflammation; Steatohepatitis
Jamialahmadi T.; Nematy M.; Bo S.; Ponzo V.; Jangjoo A.; Goshayeshi L.; Tasbandi A.; Nikiforov N.G.; Sahebkar A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1794793
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