A significant challenge in orthopedics is the design of biomaterial devices that are able to perform biological functions by substituting or repairing various tissues and controlling bone repair when required. This review presents an overview of the current state of our recent research into biomaterial modifications to reduce bacterial adhesive ability, compared with previous reviews and excellent research papers, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. In particular, we investigated biomaterials for replacement, such as metallic materials (titanium and titanium alloys) and polymers (ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene), and biomaterials for regeneration, such as poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and calcium phosphates as composites. Biomaterials have been designed, developed, and characterized to define surface/bulk features; they have also been subjected to bacterial adhesion assays to verify their potential capability to counteract infections. The addition of metal ions (e.g., silver), natural antimicrobial compounds (e.g., essential oils), or antioxidant agents (e.g., vitamin E) to different biomaterials conferred strong antibacterial properties and anti-adhesive features, improving their capability to counteract prosthetic joint infections and biofilm formation, which are important issues in orthopedic surgery. The complexity of biological materials is still far from being reached by materials science through the development of sophisticated biomaterials. However, close interdisciplinary work by materials scientists, engineers, microbiologists, chemists, physicists, and orthopedic surgeons is indeed necessary to modify the structures of biomaterials in order to achieve implant integration and tissue regeneration while avoiding microbial contamination.

Current Knowledge on Biomaterials for Orthopedic Applications Modified to Reduce Bacterial Adhesive Ability [*S. Comini is the corresponding author]

Allizond, V
First
;
Comini, S
;
Cuffini, AM;Banche, G
Last
2022

Abstract

A significant challenge in orthopedics is the design of biomaterial devices that are able to perform biological functions by substituting or repairing various tissues and controlling bone repair when required. This review presents an overview of the current state of our recent research into biomaterial modifications to reduce bacterial adhesive ability, compared with previous reviews and excellent research papers, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. In particular, we investigated biomaterials for replacement, such as metallic materials (titanium and titanium alloys) and polymers (ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene), and biomaterials for regeneration, such as poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and calcium phosphates as composites. Biomaterials have been designed, developed, and characterized to define surface/bulk features; they have also been subjected to bacterial adhesion assays to verify their potential capability to counteract infections. The addition of metal ions (e.g., silver), natural antimicrobial compounds (e.g., essential oils), or antioxidant agents (e.g., vitamin E) to different biomaterials conferred strong antibacterial properties and anti-adhesive features, improving their capability to counteract prosthetic joint infections and biofilm formation, which are important issues in orthopedic surgery. The complexity of biological materials is still far from being reached by materials science through the development of sophisticated biomaterials. However, close interdisciplinary work by materials scientists, engineers, microbiologists, chemists, physicists, and orthopedic surgeons is indeed necessary to modify the structures of biomaterials in order to achieve implant integration and tissue regeneration while avoiding microbial contamination.
11
4
1
24
prosthetic joint infections; septic loosening; multifunctional biomaterials; UHMWPE; titanium alloys; poly(epsilon-caprolactone); antibacterial properties; vitamin E; oxidation; silver; essential oils
Allizond, V; Comini, S; Cuffini, AM; Banche, G
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Allizond_antibiotics_2022.pdf

Accesso aperto

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 1.19 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.19 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Allizond_antibiotics_2022.pdf

Accesso riservato

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 1.19 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.19 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1857273
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact