:Angiogenesis, the active formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a complex and demanding biological process that plays an important role in physiological as well as pathological settings. Recent evidence supports cell metabolism as a critical regulator of angiogenesis. However, whether and how cell metabolism regulates endothelial growth factor receptor levels and nucleotide synthesis remains elusive. We here shown in both human cell lines and mouse models that during developmental and pathological angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs) use glutaminolysis-derived glutamate to produce aspartate (Asp) via aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT). Asp leads to mTORC1 activation which, in turn, regulates endothelial translation machinery for VEGFR2 and FGFR1 synthesis. Asp-dependent mTORC1 pathway activation also regulates de novo pyrimidine synthesis in angiogenic ECs. These findings identify glutaminolysis-derived Asp as a regulator of mTORC1-dependent endothelial translation and pyrimidine synthesis. Our studies may help overcome anti-VEGF therapy resistance by targeting endothelial growth factor receptor translation.

Aspartate metabolism in endothelial cells activates the mTORC1 pathway to initiate translation during angiogenesis

Roxana E. Oberkersch;Emiliano Panieri;Alessia Brossa;Benedetta Bussolati;Massimo M. Santoro
2022-01-01

Abstract

:Angiogenesis, the active formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a complex and demanding biological process that plays an important role in physiological as well as pathological settings. Recent evidence supports cell metabolism as a critical regulator of angiogenesis. However, whether and how cell metabolism regulates endothelial growth factor receptor levels and nucleotide synthesis remains elusive. We here shown in both human cell lines and mouse models that during developmental and pathological angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs) use glutaminolysis-derived glutamate to produce aspartate (Asp) via aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT). Asp leads to mTORC1 activation which, in turn, regulates endothelial translation machinery for VEGFR2 and FGFR1 synthesis. Asp-dependent mTORC1 pathway activation also regulates de novo pyrimidine synthesis in angiogenic ECs. These findings identify glutaminolysis-derived Asp as a regulator of mTORC1-dependent endothelial translation and pyrimidine synthesis. Our studies may help overcome anti-VEGF therapy resistance by targeting endothelial growth factor receptor translation.
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angiogenesis; aspartate metabolism; endothelial metabolism; mTOR signalling; tumor angiogenesis
Roxana E. Oberkersch, Giovanna Pontarin, Matteo Astone, Marianna Spizzotin, Liaisan Arslanbaeva, Giovanni Tosi, Emiliano Panieri, Sara Ricciardi, Maria Francesca Allega, Alessia Brossa, Paolo Grumati, Benedetta Bussolati, Stefano Biffo, Saverio Tardito, Massimo M. Santoro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1875578
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