In this study we investigated the levels of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) in serum, whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from anti-EA IgG seropositive or anti-EA IgG seronegative EBV infected renal transplant recipients. We compared serological data with the viral load to monitor the risk of developing post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). All patients were asymptomatic and none of them developed PTLD at the time of the study. EBV DNA quantitation for each patient varied in whole blood and PBMC samples probably due to different numbers of mononuclear cells present in samples from which DNA was extracted (whole blood vs. purified PBMC). In 92% of the serum samples EBV DNA was undetectable probably due to absence of free genomes since the number of DNA copies detected in samples from whole blood and PBMC does not reach very high levels. The correlation between the presence of EA-antibody, considered serological evidence of EBV reactivation, and the viral load showed that 60% of EA-positive patients had quantifiable EBV DNA, whereas in 40% of EA-positive patients EBV DNA was undetectable, showing serological reactivity but no viral replication. Of the remaining EA-negative patients, EBV DNA could be detected in 71% of them, whereas 29% did not show EBV DNA, indicating no EBV replication. In conclusion, our results confirm that the presence of serum IgG anti-EA antibody is not a reliable marker of active EBV infection whereas the evaluation of the viral load in blood samples is a useful diagnostic tool to monitor and to better understand the course of EBV infection in immunocompromised renal transplant patients at risk of developing PTLD.

Quantitative PCR in EBV-infected renal transplant patients.

MERLINO, Chiara;CAVALLO, Rossana;BERGALLO, Massimiliano;NEGRO PONZI, Alessandro
2001

Abstract

In this study we investigated the levels of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) in serum, whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from anti-EA IgG seropositive or anti-EA IgG seronegative EBV infected renal transplant recipients. We compared serological data with the viral load to monitor the risk of developing post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). All patients were asymptomatic and none of them developed PTLD at the time of the study. EBV DNA quantitation for each patient varied in whole blood and PBMC samples probably due to different numbers of mononuclear cells present in samples from which DNA was extracted (whole blood vs. purified PBMC). In 92% of the serum samples EBV DNA was undetectable probably due to absence of free genomes since the number of DNA copies detected in samples from whole blood and PBMC does not reach very high levels. The correlation between the presence of EA-antibody, considered serological evidence of EBV reactivation, and the viral load showed that 60% of EA-positive patients had quantifiable EBV DNA, whereas in 40% of EA-positive patients EBV DNA was undetectable, showing serological reactivity but no viral replication. Of the remaining EA-negative patients, EBV DNA could be detected in 71% of them, whereas 29% did not show EBV DNA, indicating no EBV replication. In conclusion, our results confirm that the presence of serum IgG anti-EA antibody is not a reliable marker of active EBV infection whereas the evaluation of the viral load in blood samples is a useful diagnostic tool to monitor and to better understand the course of EBV infection in immunocompromised renal transplant patients at risk of developing PTLD.
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MERLINO C; CAVALLO R; BERGALLO M; GIORGI S; FORGNONE F; RE D; SINESI F; MUSSO T; A. NEGRO PONZI
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/37211
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