AIM: Serum uric acid is associated with the metabolic syndrome and its components, while its relationship with cardiovascular disease is controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between uric acid and adipokines, markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction, which are all linked to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: The associations between uric acid and adiponectin, resistin, leptin, high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitrotyrosine, Total Antioxidant Status (TAS), E-selectin, vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were cross-sectionally evaluated in a randomly collected sample of 100 men from a population-based cohort. RESULTS: Subjects within the highest uric acid quartile showed a worse metabolic pattern and a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome [odds ratio (OR)=3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-8.2; p<0.001 for each 50 micromol/l uric acid increment in a logistic regression model after multiple adjustments]. Nitrotyrosine and adiponectin were significantly lower, while TAS, hs-CRP, E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were higher in the groups with increased uric acid levels. In a multiple regression model, after adjustments for multiple confounders, uric acid levels were inversely associated with nitrotyrosine (p<0.001) and adiponectin (p=0.02), and directly with TAS (p<0.001), and E-selectin (p=0.006). CONCLUSION: Serum uric acid showed opposite relationships, being associated with both beneficial (inverse association with nitrotyrosine, direct association with TAS) and detrimental (inverse association with adiponectin, direct association with E-selectin) markers, thus providing a possible explanation for the previously reported controversial and not linear association between uric acid and cardiovascular disease.

Associations between serum uric acid and adipokines, markers of inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction

BO, Simona;GAMBINO, Roberto;DURAZZO, Marilena;CASSADER, Maurizio;CAVALLO PERIN, Paolo;PAGANO, Gian Franco
2008-01-01

Abstract

AIM: Serum uric acid is associated with the metabolic syndrome and its components, while its relationship with cardiovascular disease is controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between uric acid and adipokines, markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction, which are all linked to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: The associations between uric acid and adiponectin, resistin, leptin, high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitrotyrosine, Total Antioxidant Status (TAS), E-selectin, vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were cross-sectionally evaluated in a randomly collected sample of 100 men from a population-based cohort. RESULTS: Subjects within the highest uric acid quartile showed a worse metabolic pattern and a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome [odds ratio (OR)=3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-8.2; p<0.001 for each 50 micromol/l uric acid increment in a logistic regression model after multiple adjustments]. Nitrotyrosine and adiponectin were significantly lower, while TAS, hs-CRP, E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were higher in the groups with increased uric acid levels. In a multiple regression model, after adjustments for multiple confounders, uric acid levels were inversely associated with nitrotyrosine (p<0.001) and adiponectin (p=0.02), and directly with TAS (p<0.001), and E-selectin (p=0.006). CONCLUSION: Serum uric acid showed opposite relationships, being associated with both beneficial (inverse association with nitrotyrosine, direct association with TAS) and detrimental (inverse association with adiponectin, direct association with E-selectin) markers, thus providing a possible explanation for the previously reported controversial and not linear association between uric acid and cardiovascular disease.
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504
Bo S; Gambino R; Durazzo M; Ghione F; Musso G; Gentile L; Cassader M; Cavallo-Perin P; Pagano G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/51224
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